Matki Sprouting Goodness

Matki Sprouting Goodness

A Nutritious (Behe)Moth 100 grams of moth beans contains 23 grams of protein and hence, an excellent source of protein for vegetarians. Matki is...
Keep Calm and Stay Fit With Masoor Dal

Keep Calm and Stay Fit With Masoor Dal

Pulses have been an inherent part of various cuisines, predominantly found in the diverse Indian subcontinent and considered a great source of proteins for vegetarians. The roots of Masoor Dal, also known as Puy Lentils, can be traced back to Egypt, as early as the 1600 BCE. Masoor Dal’s nutritional value and versatility makes it a popular choice for several dishes in the country.
Urad Dal The Power Packed Legume

Urad Dal The Power Packed Legume

Loaded with nutritional value and brimming with protein and vitamins, urad dal is an integral part of the Indian diet, especially in South India. Whole white urad dal is used to make batter for fluffy, delicious idlis, dosas and vadaas. It is also used to make the ubiquitous paapad, liked by food lovers all over India and the world.
Toor the comfort dal

Toor the comfort dal

For most Indians, home food is synonymous with dal chawal. However far one might travel, feasting on international cuisine, at the end of the day, the heart and soul crave a home-cooked meal comprising of a bowl of steaming hot, well-seasoned golden Dal with roti or rice. For most people, that much-desired bowl of dal is usually toor.
Rajma: The King of Beans

Rajma: The King of Beans

Known as ‘kidney beans’ to much of the English-speaking world, Rajma is a legume that needs no introduction in India. Part of every Punjabi household’s Sunday feast and a regular feature in dhabas across the country, Rajma Chawal for most Indians is synonymous with ‘ma ka pyaar’. A rich source of anti-oxidants and cholesterol-lowering fibre, it has a whole lot of dietary benefits and sweet memories attached to it, too.
Organic dals naturally the healthy alternative

Organic dals naturally the healthy alternative

With people nowadays growing more and more conscious of what they eat and where is that food coming from, the response for organic foods is on the rise. Easily available these days, compared to the situation a few years ago, foods grown through organic farming methods are produced without the use of chemical fertilizers and/or pesticides.
Chawli The Nutritional Powerhouse

Chawli The Nutritional Powerhouse

Chawli, which also goes by rongi, lobia, alsande kalu, karamani, alasandalu, first made its way into Indian gastronomy in 200 BC and has taken a place in Indian cuisine ever since. From then on, it has journeyed its way into cuisines of Africa, South America, the Carribbean, amongst other parts of the world. Additionally, Chawli’s numerous health benefits are what leads the legume to feature in Indian soups, curries, vadas and salads.
Besan The Better Batter

Besan The Better Batter

Bengal gram (Chana Dal) flour is one of the most ancient flours used in India. It finds prominent mention in ancient texts as part of a wholesome, balanced meal.

Indian cuisine uses Besan in two forms. Namely, coarse texture, or gargara, for dishes that require a granular and crunchy consistency, prepared from coarsely ground Besan. This includes fritters, bhajiyas, sweets, etc. And then comes fine texture, for dishes that require a free-flowing smooth consistency, prepared from Fine Besan.