New Age Khichdi Ideas

New Age Khichdi Ideas

There are a host of modern, innovative khichdi ideas that put an amazing spin on the traditional recipe and add toothsome flavours! You could try out brown rice, dalia (or broken wheat) or even any of the other indian millets – all rich in powerful nutrients. Play with the dals – toor, moong, urad, masoor, rajma, and chana. Throw in a multitude of vegetables – carrots, tomatoes, peas, potatoes, cauliflower and asparagus to augment taste as well as to give the dish oodles of visual appeal. Experiment with different spices – cumin, coriander, mustard, turmeric, and curry leaves. Each version will turn out scrumptious and wholesome!

Pongal, the festival and the dish

Pongal, the festival and the dish

Pongal, the harvest festival celebrated particularly by the Tamil community honours freshly harvested produce and gives thanks for the abundance. The dishes prepared for the pongal festival, therefore, mainly involve freshly harvested rice, dal and jaggery (from sugarcane)
The fascinating wellness facts about Makar Sankranti

The fascinating wellness facts about Makar Sankranti

‘Makar Sankranti’ is known as ‘lohri’ in the north, ‘pongal’ in the south, ‘uttarayan’ in Gujarat, ‘bhogali bihu’ in Assam and ‘til sankranti’ in Bihar – all over India, this joyous occasion is celebrated as the winter harvest festival. The gorgeous sun enters the Capricorn, marking the beginning of longer days and so we dedicate this festival to Lord Surya and all the goodness it brings with it.
Makar Sankranti Food Traditions

Makar Sankranti Food Traditions

Festivals are always time for joy and celebration. Most festivals celebrated in India, along with traditions that accompany these festivals, are rooted in ancient wisdom and natural phenomenon. Mid-January sees many festivals being celebrated across India at the same time - Makar Sankranti, Pongal, Lohri, etc. All of these either welcome the season of spring or celebrate harvest season. Whether it is flying kites or eating til-gud ladoos, each custom holds its unique significance. And so do the dishes traditionally consumed at this time of the year
The Sankranti Effect

The Sankranti Effect

Makar Sankranti is a widely loved and celebrated Indian festival across the country. It is called by different names: Lohri in Punjab, Magh Bihu in Assam and Pongal in Tamil Nadu, but while every region celebrates it differently, the spirit is the same everywhere and the festival is synonymous with special food. Traditionally during Makar Sankranti (that signals the end of harsh winter and advent of warmer days) people celebrate with a range of traditional delicacies made with specific ingredients tailored to meet the seasons demand.